Chronic Substance Abuse

Point-in-Time 2014 Results

2014 PIT Tables

We are excited to share the results from the 2014 Point-in-Time study that was conducted in January. For a .PDF file of the data table and interpretation of results, click here.

We would like to extend a thank you, once again, to friends who conducted interviews with us this year as well as community members who have been involved with One Roof in the past.  Collecting this data cannot happen without you!  Make sure that when you’re reviewing the table you pay attention to the “unsheltered” count.  Point-in-Time volunteers are responsible for the total unsheltered count in our area!  Thank you for reaching out to 414 unsheltered individuals in our community so that we can better understand how to help.

The data in the table above gives a snapshot of who was homeless on any given night in 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014 in Jefferson, Shelby, and St. Clair counties of Alabama.  The Total numbers are comprised of the sheltered and unsheltered numbers added together.  2014 results are highlighted in purple.

Please note that the sub-populations stand alone and do not represent additional people to those listed in theIndividualsTotal Persons in Families, or Total Personsrows.  Sub-population numbers represent every instance where the sub-population applied to an individual.Families are the number of homeless households we have seen with dependent children, and Total Persons in Families is the number of individuals belonging to those households.

This year 120 volunteers helped to conduct the Point in Time survey in the metropolitan Birmingham area.  This is the second year we were able to expand street counts to include parts of Woodlawn, Avondale, East Lake, West End, and other neighborhoods outside of downtown.  Volunteers are responsible for the total unsheltered count (31% of the total homeless population).

The sheltered numbers come directly from a database used by our service providers called PromisAL, which records services and acts as a tool to connect services in our homeless Continuum of Care.

Here are some highlights that we can see in this year’s data: 

  • Our count in January 2014 shows that overall homeless numbers have decreased by 140 individuals (a decrease of 10%) since January 2013.  From 2005 to 2014, there has been a decrease of 1,099 individuals (nearly a 55% decrease).
  • Homeless families (households) increased slightly this year from 2013 by 6%. There was a 35% decrease in the number of unsheltered families, but there was a 35% increase in families living in transitional housing.  This shows that in the past year, almost 1 to 1 those families have gotten into housing and are on their way to living a stable life in permanent housing.
  •  For someone to be chronically homeless, they must have experienced 4 or more episodes of homelessness within 3 years OR experienced continual homeless for 1 or more years AND have a mental or physical disability.  This population is the hardest to house and often the least likely to seek services.  Since 2009, we have seen a 51% decrease in the number of chronically homeless individuals in our community.
  •  Homeless veterans have been steadily decreasing over the past few years, and this year is no exception.  There is a national initiative to end veteran homelessness by 2015, and the good news is that all the hard work of our veteran’s agencies has brought us very close.  This year, there was a 10% decrease in the number of veterans experiencing homelessness, with the majority of those veterans (156 out of 174 total) in shelter rather than on the street.
  •  Despite slightly elevated numbers of people living with HIV/AIDS and experiencing homelessness, the overall number of these individuals has declined significantly since 2005, decreasing by 67%
  • Unfortunately, we have seen elevated sheltered, unsheltered, and total numbers of community members who are survivors of domestic violence and experiencing homelessness. Since 2013, the number of survivors of domestic violence experiencing homelessness has had a pronounced increase of nearly 46%.
  • We are also pleased to see a decrease, however small, in the number of people experiencing homelessness who suffer from chronic substance abuse.  However, we have also seen a 7% total increase in the number of people with a serious mental illness (395 in 2013 to 423 in 2014), with a 30% increase in the number of people with a serious mental illness who are unsheltered.

Please let us know if you have any questions or suggestions for improving our process next year, and thank you for your patience while waiting for the results.  Thank you for helping us to fulfill our mission to equip and empower our community to prevent and end homelessness through advocacy, education, and coordination of services.   Thank you for your work to improve the community we share.

We hope you have a great summer and that we’ll see you next year for PIT 2015!


Stacy Oliver
Community Outreach Coordinator
One Roof
stacy@oneroofonline.org

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